Bone Health

Common Nutrients for Bone Health

From: US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health
Article: Essential Nutrients for Bone Health and a Review of their Availability in the Average North American Diet

Nutrient
RDA
Median
Intake
Authors’ Preferred Supplementation
Vitamin D
600-800 IU
150-300 IU
400-1000 IU
Calcium
1000-1200 mg
735 mg
500 mg
Magnesium
320-420 mg
243 mg
250-350 mg
Silicon
*40 mg for bone health
21 mg
20-40 mg
Vitamin K
90-120 µgm
70-80 µgm
50-150 µgm
Boron
*3 mg for bone health
1 mg
1-3 mg
Vitamin C
75-90 mg
103 mg
50-100 mg
Copper
0.9 mg
1.1 mg
None
Zinc
8-11 mg
9.6 mg
None unless vegetarian or elderly
Manganese
1.8-2.3 mg
2.8 mg
None

Calcium “Cheat Sheet”

From: Arthritis Foundation
Article: What You Need to Know About Calcium Supplements

There are several different types of calcium. Check out the chart below for the three most popular types, and to help determine the best calcium supplement for you. Other kinds, such as calcium gluconate and calcium lactate, have very low amounts of elemental calcium and are not recommended. Coral calcium and oyster-shell calcium products also are best avoided because they may contain lead.

Calcium Type
Pros
Cons
Calcium citrate
(CitricalSolgar) 21% calcium
Most easily absorbed
Most expensive; doesn’t contain much elemental calcium
Calcium carbonate 40% calcium
Least expensive; has more elemental calcium
Must be taken with meals or glass of acidic (orange) juice; may cause gas or constipation
Calcium phosphate 39% calcium
Does not cause gas or constipation; easily absorbed
More expensive than calcium carbonate

Available Calcium Supplements in the Market

Brand
Calcium Type
Other Ingredients
USANA MagneCal D

Drug Registered Home Remedy
FDA Reg.
125 mg Calcium (Equivalent to 223.8 mg Calcium Citrate and 216.67 mg Calcium Carbonate)
3 mg Vitamin D3 (as Cholecalciferol), 125 mg Magnesium (equivalent to 350 mg Magnesium Citrate and 345.83 mg Magnesium Carbonate), 330 mcg Boron (equivalend to 13.20 mg Boron Citrate), 4.5 mg Silicon (as Calcium Silicate)
CALTRATE 600 +D3
“NO APPROVED THERAPEUTIC CLAIMS”
600 mg Calcium Carbonate
800 IU (20 mcg) Vitamin D3 (as Cholecalciferol)
CALCIUMADE
“NO APPROVED THERAPEUTIC CLAIMS”
600 mg Calcium Carbonate
400 IU (10 mcg) Vitamin D3 (as Cholecalciferol), 40 mg Magnesium (as Magnesium Oxide), 7.5 mg Zinc (as Zinc Oxide), 1.8 mg Manganese (as Manganese Sulfate)
CALCI-AID
“NO APPROVED THERAPEUTIC CLAIMS”
500 mg Calcium Carbonate
ATC Calcium with D3
“NO APPROVED THERAPEUTIC CLAIMS”
750 mg Calcium Carbonate
100 IU (2.5 mcg) Vitamin D3, 432 mg Soybean Oil

What does “no approved therapeutic claims” label really mean? How do food supplements differ from medical drugs?

“No Approved Therapeutic Claims” means – the claims of these products are not validated by the BFAD/FDA.

BFAD/FDA is not authorized to review dietary supplement products for safety and effectiveness before they are marketed. The manufacturers and distributors of dietary supplements are responsible for making sure their products are safe BEFORE they go to market.

All prescription and non-prescription drugs are regulated by the BFAD/FDA, but dietary supplements are treated more like special foods.

Because supplements aren’t considered drugs, they aren’t put through the same strict safety and effectiveness requirements that drugs are. So all the drugs you can buy, even without a prescription, must be proven safe and effective – but dietary supplements do not.